One-Stop - Your guide to life in China http://onestop.globaltimes.cn All the knowledge you need for life in China Mon, 09 Nov 2015 01:23:12 +0000 zh-CN hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.8.1 How to withdraw money from WeChat Wallet http://onestop.globaltimes.cn/how-to-withdraw-money-from-wechat-wallet/ http://onestop.globaltimes.cn/how-to-withdraw-money-from-wechat-wallet/#comments Wed, 15 Jul 2015 06:01:37 +0000 http://onestop.globaltimes.cn/?p=5486 Cash out the money in your WeChat Wallet quickly and easily with our guide! And if you haven't signed up to WeChat Wallet yet, here's how.
 
1: Log into your WeChat app; you should see the screen below, or something like it. 
Wechat withdrawl 1

Tap A to show your personal page. Then tap B to access your Wallet.

2: You will now be in the screen below.

Wechat withdrawl 2

Tap A and you will be taken to the balance screen (We're assuming that you have a bank card associated with your Wallet already, but if not tap the bank card to add a new one.)

3: You will now see how much money is in your WeChat Wallet account, in Chinese yuan. 
Wechat withdrawl 3

Tap A to withdraw the money.

4: The next screen will allow you to choose the card/account to pay the money into, and the amount to be paid.

Wechat withdrawl 4
Tap the down-arrow (A) if you want to change to another bank card if you don't want to transfer the money into the one shown. If you didn't add another card earlier, you can do so after tapping this arrow too (we'll cover this in step 7). Tap B to input the money you want to withdraw from WeChat Wallet and tap Next to proceed.

5: You will see the confirmation screen.

Wechat withdrawl 5

Confirm the amount of money you want to withdraw. If it is correct, key in your six-digit payment password.

6: You're done!

Wechat withdrawl 6
Text A reads: "Your withdrawal application has been submitted, and the money will be transferred to your bank account within the same day." You can see the bank card and withdrawal amount on this page. Click Done to finish the procedure and wait for the money to be transferred to the bank card.

7: If the bank card you want to transfer the money to in your WeChat wallet to is not yet linked to your WeChat account, follow up to step 4, then press B in that diagram. 

Wechat withdrawl 7
8: Once this is done, key in the amount you want to transfer and tap Next to proceed.

Wechat withdrawl 8

9: Key in the password, as per Step 5

10: You will see the following screen:

Wechat withdrawl 9

You can only link your own bank cards to WeChat Wallet, so your name will be automatically shown in A. Put in the card number in B. When you click Next, the app will guide you to Step 6 to finish the procedure.

 

Useful Chinese words and phrases

提现tíxiànWithdraw
密码mìmǎPassword
钱包qiánbāoWallet
账户存款zhànghù cúnkuǎnBalance
支付密码zhīfù mìmǎ Payment password

 

 

 

]]>

Cash out the money in your WeChat Wallet quickly and easily with our guide! And if you haven’t signed up to WeChat Wallet yet, here’s how.
 
1: Log into your WeChat app; you should see the screen below, or something like it. 
Wechat withdrawl 1

Tap A to show your personal page. Then tap B to access your Wallet.

2: You will now be in the screen below.

Wechat withdrawl 2

Tap A and you will be taken to the balance screen (We’re assuming that you have a bank card associated with your Wallet already, but if not tap the bank card to add a new one.)

3: You will now see how much money is in your WeChat Wallet account, in Chinese yuan. 
Wechat withdrawl 3

Tap A to withdraw the money.

4: The next screen will allow you to choose the card/account to pay the money into, and the amount to be paid.

Wechat withdrawl 4
Tap the down-arrow (A) if you want to change to another bank card if you don’t want to transfer the money into the one shown. If you didn’t add another card earlier, you can do so after tapping this arrow too (we’ll cover this in step 7). Tap B to input the money you want to withdraw from WeChat Wallet and tap Next to proceed.

5: You will see the confirmation screen.

Wechat withdrawl 5

Confirm the amount of money you want to withdraw. If it is correct, key in your six-digit payment password.

6: You’re done!

Wechat withdrawl 6
Text A reads: “Your withdrawal application has been submitted, and the money will be transferred to your bank account within the same day.” You can see the bank card and withdrawal amount on this page. Click Done to finish the procedure and wait for the money to be transferred to the bank card.

7: If the bank card you want to transfer the money to in your WeChat wallet to is not yet linked to your WeChat account, follow up to step 4, then press B in that diagram. 

Wechat withdrawl 7
8: Once this is done, key in the amount you want to transfer and tap Next to proceed.

Wechat withdrawl 8

9: Key in the password, as per Step 5

10: You will see the following screen:

Wechat withdrawl 9

You can only link your own bank cards to WeChat Wallet, so your name will be automatically shown in A. Put in the card number in B. When you click Next, the app will guide you to Step 6 to finish the procedure.

 

Useful Chinese words and phrases

提现 tíxiàn Withdraw
密码 mìmǎ Password
钱包 qiánbāo Wallet
账户存款 zhànghù cúnkuǎn Balance
支付密码 zhīfù mìmǎ  Payment password

 

 

 

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Do I still need a Work Visa if I’m working in China for a short time (a “short work stay”)? http://onestop.globaltimes.cn/do-i-still-need-a-work-visa-if-im-working-in-china-for-a-short-time-a-short-work-stay/ http://onestop.globaltimes.cn/do-i-still-need-a-work-visa-if-im-working-in-china-for-a-short-time-a-short-work-stay/#comments Tue, 14 Jul 2015 03:06:15 +0000 http://onestop.globaltimes.cn/?p=5475  

The_LevellersPhoto by Brian Marks

 

If you're planning to come to China to perform any kind of paid work for a Chinese (or China-based) company - even if you're in a famous rock band - then you need to apply for some form of visa. This is true even if you are staying for less than 90 days. This has been the case since China's Ministry of Human Resources and Social Security circulated an order to this effect on January 1, 2015.

 

When a Z Visa (Work Visa) is required

Foreigners must apply for a Work Visa if they will be staying in China for up to 90 days for the following five reasons:

  1. They have been invited by a Chinese company or the Chinese government to complete tasks involving technology, scientific research, management, guidance or cooperation,
  2. They have been invited to participate in athletic tryouts at a Chinese sporting institution such as a school, club, sports association etc,
  3. To shoot films, including advertisements and documentaries,
  4. To perform in fashion shows, including car modeling and print advertisements,
  5. To participate as performers in commercial performances (eg. a band playing at a bar or nightclub).

 

When an M Visa (Business Visa) is required

Foreigners must apply for a Business Visa if they will be staying in China for up to 90 days for the following reasons:

  1. Providing services such as maintenance, installation, commissioning, disassembly, guidance or training associated with the purchase of machines and equipment,
  2. Guiding, supervising and inspecting a project that has been won in a bid and will be carried out in China,
  3. Being sent to work short-term at a Chinese branch, subsidiary or representative office of a foreign company,
  4. Performing a role as an athlete, coach, medical staff, assistant and or related staff participating in most sports competitions.

 

When an F Visa (Tourist Visa) is required

Foreigners must apply for a Tourist Visa if they will be staying in China for up to 90 days for the following reasons:

  1. Volunteering (eg. at an orphanage), whether for free or for money, as long as the payment comes from a foreign entity,
  2. Participating in commercial performances noted as "foreign-related non-commercial performances" by the cultural authorities in the Approval Letter.

 

How to apply for a Work Visa for short-term tasks

Foreign entertainment individuals or entities will need to gather the following documents - your employer/inviter should provide you with copies of 1, 2, 3, 5 and 6 in this list. Once you have the documents, you can follow the application process as seen on this page.

  1. An Approval Letter from the relevant local cultural authorities, noting whether the visit is for commercial or non-commercial purposes,
  2. Get the Approval of Short-term Employment for Foreigners Working in China, which is a stamped form, from the relevant local cultural authorities. "Entertainment groups" such as a band, circus or choir, can use one Approval Letter and Approval of Short-term Employment for their whole group (non-entertainment groups should follow the guide below for "Other foreigners"),
  3. Invitation letter from the inviting company,
  4. Original passport (with at least six months to go before expiration at the time of application),
  5. Copy of inviting company's business license and tax certificate,
  6. Cooperation agreement/project contract between the inviting company and the invited group/individuals.

 

Other foreigners will need to gather the following documents - as above, your employer/inviter should provide you with copies of 1, 2, 3, 5 and 6 in this list. Once you have the documents, you can follow the application process as seen on this page.

  1. A Work Permit from the local Human Resources and Social Security Bureau (see this page for list of addresses),
  2. Approval of Short-term Employment for Foreigners Working in China, which is a stamped form, from local Human Resources and Social Security Bureau,
  3. Invitation letter from the Chinese partner company,
  4. Original, signed passport (with at least six months to go before expiration at the time of application),
  5. Copy of Chinese partner's business license and tax certificate,
  6. Cooperation agreement/project contract between the parties.

 

If the foreign parties intend to stay in China for more than 30 days, they need to apply for a residence permit within 30 days of arrival. 

The Work Visa for short-term tasks can't be extended. Anyone who wants to work for more than 90 days should apply for a regular Work Visa. You can check our guide here.

If you are found on wrong type of visa, you might face penalties. For more information see this article.

 

Useful Chinese words and phrases

短期工作签证duǎnqī gōngzuò qiānzhèngShort-term Employment Visa
文化部门批准书wénhuà bùmén pīzhǔnshūApproval Letter from cultural authorities
外国人在中国短期工作证明wàiguórén zài zhōngguó duǎnqī gōngzuò zhèngmíngApproval of Short-term Employment for Foreigners Working in China
体育机构tǐyù jīgòuSports institutions
涉外商业表演shèwài shāngyè biǎoyǎnForeign-related Commercial Performance
非商业表演fēi shāngyè biǎoyǎnNon-Commercial Performance
志愿者zhìyuàn zhě Volunteer
演艺团体yǎnyì tuántǐ Entertainment Group

 

 

]]>

 

The_LevellersPhoto by Brian Marks

 

If you’re planning to come to China to perform any kind of paid work for a Chinese (or China-based) company - even if you’re in a famous rock band – then you need to apply for some form of visa. This is true even if you are staying for less than 90 days. This has been the case since China’s Ministry of Human Resources and Social Security circulated an order to this effect on January 1, 2015.

 

When a Z Visa (Work Visa) is required

Foreigners must apply for a Work Visa if they will be staying in China for up to 90 days for the following five reasons:

  1. They have been invited by a Chinese company or the Chinese government to complete tasks involving technology, scientific research, management, guidance or cooperation,
  2. They have been invited to participate in athletic tryouts at a Chinese sporting institution such as a school, club, sports association etc,
  3. To shoot films, including advertisements and documentaries,
  4. To perform in fashion shows, including car modeling and print advertisements,
  5. To participate as performers in commercial performances (eg. a band playing at a bar or nightclub).

 

When an M Visa (Business Visa) is required

Foreigners must apply for a Business Visa if they will be staying in China for up to 90 days for the following reasons:

  1. Providing services such as maintenance, installation, commissioning, disassembly, guidance or training associated with the purchase of machines and equipment,
  2. Guiding, supervising and inspecting a project that has been won in a bid and will be carried out in China,
  3. Being sent to work short-term at a Chinese branch, subsidiary or representative office of a foreign company,
  4. Performing a role as an athlete, coach, medical staff, assistant and or related staff participating in most sports competitions.

 

When an F Visa (Tourist Visa) is required

Foreigners must apply for a Tourist Visa if they will be staying in China for up to 90 days for the following reasons:

  1. Volunteering (eg. at an orphanage), whether for free or for money, as long as the payment comes from a foreign entity,
  2. Participating in commercial performances noted as “foreign-related non-commercial performances” by the cultural authorities in the Approval Letter.

 

How to apply for a Work Visa for short-term tasks

Foreign entertainment individuals or entities will need to gather the following documents – your employer/inviter should provide you with copies of 1, 2, 3, 5 and 6 in this list. Once you have the documents, you can follow the application process as seen on this page.

  1. An Approval Letter from the relevant local cultural authorities, noting whether the visit is for commercial or non-commercial purposes,
  2. Get the Approval of Short-term Employment for Foreigners Working in China, which is a stamped form, from the relevant local cultural authorities. “Entertainment groups” such as a band, circus or choir, can use one Approval Letter and Approval of Short-term Employment for their whole group (non-entertainment groups should follow the guide below for “Other foreigners”),
  3. Invitation letter from the inviting company,
  4. Original passport (with at least six months to go before expiration at the time of application),
  5. Copy of inviting company’s business license and tax certificate,
  6. Cooperation agreement/project contract between the inviting company and the invited group/individuals.

 

Other foreigners will need to gather the following documents – as above, your employer/inviter should provide you with copies of 1, 2, 3, 5 and 6 in this list. Once you have the documents, you can follow the application process as seen on this page.

  1. A Work Permit from the local Human Resources and Social Security Bureau (see this page for list of addresses),
  2. Approval of Short-term Employment for Foreigners Working in China, which is a stamped form, from local Human Resources and Social Security Bureau,
  3. Invitation letter from the Chinese partner company,
  4. Original, signed passport (with at least six months to go before expiration at the time of application),
  5. Copy of Chinese partner’s business license and tax certificate,
  6. Cooperation agreement/project contract between the parties.

 

If the foreign parties intend to stay in China for more than 30 days, they need to apply for a residence permit within 30 days of arrival. 

The Work Visa for short-term tasks can’t be extended. Anyone who wants to work for more than 90 days should apply for a regular Work Visa. You can check our guide here.

If you are found on wrong type of visa, you might face penalties. For more information see this article.

 

Useful Chinese words and phrases

短期工作签证 duǎnqī gōngzuò qiānzhèng Short-term Employment Visa
文化部门批准书 wénhuà bùmén pīzhǔnshū Approval Letter from cultural authorities
外国人在中国短期工作证明 wàiguórén zài zhōngguó duǎnqī gōngzuò zhèngmíng Approval of Short-term Employment for Foreigners Working in China
体育机构 tǐyù jīgòu Sports institutions
涉外商业表演 shèwài shāngyè biǎoyǎn Foreign-related Commercial Performance
非商业表演 fēi shāngyè biǎoyǎn Non-Commercial Performance
志愿者 zhìyuàn zhě  Volunteer
演艺团体 yǎnyì tuántǐ  Entertainment Group

 

 

Similar Posts:

]]>
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Can I get the money I paid into my Chinese pension back when I leave China? http://onestop.globaltimes.cn/can-i-get-the-money-i-paid-into-my-chinese-pension-back-when-i-leave-china/ http://onestop.globaltimes.cn/can-i-get-the-money-i-paid-into-my-chinese-pension-back-when-i-leave-china/#comments Mon, 29 Jun 2015 08:37:52 +0000 http://onestop.globaltimes.cn/?p=5436 5437288053_624c075aa3_b

Photo by Steven Depolo

If you were employed in China by a Chinese company or a foreign company based in China, then you will have already made payments into a Chinese pension and other social security funds for each month you were in employment. The good news is that you can draw some of this money back out when you plan to leave China!

Of course, you may also choose to leave the money in and the account open, in case you return and find employment in China in the future. 

Do bear in mind, however, that you cannot withdraw all the money that has been paid into China's pension schemes on your behalf. As you will see in this article, each month the employer pays 20 percent of all its employee's salaries into a country-wide pool of money; the employer also takes about eight percent of each person's salary and pays that into an individual pool just for that person. 

When you go to withdraw the money from your pension account, you can only draw the money paid into your personal account, not the national pool.
 
So how do you get to all that money? Here's how…

 

How to get your money back

  1. Terminate the employment contract with your employer, through the usual means – a resignation letter or telling them directly. They should give you a stamped release letter saying that you do not work for them any more (you may need to fill in a form first, though this is not common).
  2. Next, your employer or their representative will have to take the stamped form to the local Human Resources and Social Security Bureau to terminate your employment. Before they go, however, tell them that while they are there you would like them to fill out the Personal Pension Insurance Deposit Withdrawal Application Form for Insured Foreigners (Or Citizens of Hong Kong/Macao/Taiwan); they will find this form at the Bureau. While cancelling your employment, they should also hand in this form, to notify the government that you intend to withdraw your money. 
  3. Once your employer notifies you that this has been done, take your passport, valid residence permit and release letter to the Bureau; once you get there, you can ask for and sign the Confirmation Letter for Whole Withdrawal of Basic Pension Insurance Deposit. 
  4. You will also need your bankbook or bank card; this should be an account that you have been using in the last six months. Bureaus in some cities may not accept bankbooks or cards from banks other than ICBC, Agricultural Bank of China (ABC), Bank of China (BOC) and Construction Bank of China (CCB). It is advised to contact the bureau to check which ones they accept before you go.

It usually takes seven working days to process your application; once that is concluded the pension fund will be placed into your bank account. 

 

Useful Chinese words and phrases 

一次性提取基本养老金确认书yīcìxìng tíqǔ jīběn yǎnglǎojīn quèrènshūConfirmation Letter of Whole Withdrawal of Basic Pension Insurance Deposit
终止劳动合同zhōngzhǐ láodòng hétóngEnd/Terminate Employment Contract
外国(港澳台)参保人员基本养老保险个人账户储存额一次性支取申领表wàiguó (gǎng/ào/tái) cānbǎo rényuán jīběn yǎnglǎo bǎoxiǎn gèrén zhànghù chǔcún'é yīcìxìng zhīqǔ shēnlǐngbiǎoPersonal Pension Insurance Deposit Withdraw Application Form for Insured Foreigners (Or Citizen of Hong Kong/Macao/Taiwan)

 

]]>

5437288053_624c075aa3_b

Photo by Steven Depolo

If you were employed in China by a Chinese company or a foreign company based in China, then you will have already made payments into a Chinese pension and other social security funds for each month you were in employment. The good news is that you can draw some of this money back out when you plan to leave China!

Of course, you may also choose to leave the money in and the account open, in case you return and find employment in China in the future. 

Do bear in mind, however, that you cannot withdraw all the money that has been paid into China’s pension schemes on your behalf. As you will see in this article, each month the employer pays 20 percent of all its employee’s salaries into a country-wide pool of money; the employer also takes about eight percent of each person’s salary and pays that into an individual pool just for that person. 

When you go to withdraw the money from your pension account, you can only draw the money paid into your personal account, not the national pool.
 
So how do you get to all that money? Here’s how…

 

How to get your money back

  1. Terminate the employment contract with your employer, through the usual means – a resignation letter or telling them directly. They should give you a stamped release letter saying that you do not work for them any more (you may need to fill in a form first, though this is not common).
  2. Next, your employer or their representative will have to take the stamped form to the local Human Resources and Social Security Bureau to terminate your employment. Before they go, however, tell them that while they are there you would like them to fill out the Personal Pension Insurance Deposit Withdrawal Application Form for Insured Foreigners (Or Citizens of Hong Kong/Macao/Taiwan); they will find this form at the Bureau. While cancelling your employment, they should also hand in this form, to notify the government that you intend to withdraw your money. 
  3. Once your employer notifies you that this has been done, take your passport, valid residence permit and release letter to the Bureau; once you get there, you can ask for and sign the Confirmation Letter for Whole Withdrawal of Basic Pension Insurance Deposit. 
  4. You will also need your bankbook or bank card; this should be an account that you have been using in the last six months. Bureaus in some cities may not accept bankbooks or cards from banks other than ICBC, Agricultural Bank of China (ABC), Bank of China (BOC) and Construction Bank of China (CCB). It is advised to contact the bureau to check which ones they accept before you go.

It usually takes seven working days to process your application; once that is concluded the pension fund will be placed into your bank account. 

 

Useful Chinese words and phrases 

一次性提取基本养老金确认书 yīcìxìng tíqǔ jīběn yǎnglǎojīn quèrènshū Confirmation Letter of Whole Withdrawal of Basic Pension Insurance Deposit
终止劳动合同 zhōngzhǐ láodòng hétóng End/Terminate Employment Contract
外国(港澳台)参保人员基本养老保险个人账户储存额一次性支取申领表 wàiguó (gǎng/ào/tái) cānbǎo rényuán jīběn yǎnglǎo bǎoxiǎn gèrén zhànghù chǔcún’é yīcìxìng zhīqǔ shēnlǐngbiǎo Personal Pension Insurance Deposit Withdraw Application Form for Insured Foreigners (Or Citizen of Hong Kong/Macao/Taiwan)

 

Similar Posts:

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How can I get a Chinese Certificate of No Criminal Record from outside China? http://onestop.globaltimes.cn/how-can-i-get-a-chinese-certificate-of-no-criminal-record-from-outside-china/ http://onestop.globaltimes.cn/how-can-i-get-a-chinese-certificate-of-no-criminal-record-from-outside-china/#comments Thu, 25 Jun 2015 06:30:44 +0000 http://onestop.globaltimes.cn/?p=5421 800px-Public_Security_Police_officers_China

Photo by Beijing Patrol

If you left China and now need a certificate to prove that you did not get into trouble while you were out here – perhaps because you have taken up a teaching job – you have something of an uphill struggle to get it sorted out. If you are planning to return to China you could use this guide, but it's unlikely you will want to fly all the way out to China and going to the Entry and Exit Bureau of your city's main Public Security Bureau (PSB) in person. 

However, the only alternative will involve you mailing your actual passport to a friend in China to get the document on your behalf. This is ill-advised for all the obvious reasons. 

 

Required documents

Nevertheless, if you want to get the document from outside China, you will need to make sure that your friend – your good, trustworthy friend – has the following documents:

  1. Your passport and a photocopy of your passport's information page(s). If you have changed passports since you first came to China then your friend will need your older passports as well, as police checks can only begin from the start of whichever passports you give them. Possibly your current employer will only care about your most recent passport; ask them.
  2. A stamped notice from the police confirming that you were resident in China for the given period. This means that your friend will have to go to the PSB in which you registered (the one you went to whenever you re-entered China and came back to your apartment or house) and ask them for a stamped record of your residence. If you lived in several different areas of a city, your friend can just go to the last one you registered at, as city PSBs share their data. However, if you have lived in multiple cities and your school wants statements for your whole time in China, not just for a particular city, your friend will need to go to the last PSBs you were signed in at in each city. These documents will need to be notarized at a Chinese notarization office.
  3. Photocopies of all Chinese visas and exit and entry stamps in your passport(s). 
  4. A letter from your last company with its chop/stamp, saying how long you worked for them and that during your time at the company you did nothing to break the law. If you do not have such a letter, contact your company and see if they will give a copy to your friend.
  5. Your friend will also need to their own identification, whether that is their Chinese identity card or, if they are from another country or region, their passport and residence permit. They will also need a photocopy of their ID.
  6. A letter from you (in Chinese or English) saying that they are at the police station on your behalf.

Once your friend has all of these documents, he or she should take them to the Entry and Exit Bureau of your last local police station to get the Certificate of No Criminal Record.

 

]]>

800px-Public_Security_Police_officers_China

Photo by Beijing Patrol

If you left China and now need a certificate to prove that you did not get into trouble while you were out here – perhaps because you have taken up a teaching job – you have something of an uphill struggle to get it sorted out. If you are planning to return to China you could use this guide, but it’s unlikely you will want to fly all the way out to China and going to the Entry and Exit Bureau of your city’s main Public Security Bureau (PSB) in person. 

However, the only alternative will involve you mailing your actual passport to a friend in China to get the document on your behalf. This is ill-advised for all the obvious reasons. 

 

Required documents

Nevertheless, if you want to get the document from outside China, you will need to make sure that your friend – your good, trustworthy friend – has the following documents:

  1. Your passport and a photocopy of your passport’s information page(s). If you have changed passports since you first came to China then your friend will need your older passports as well, as police checks can only begin from the start of whichever passports you give them. Possibly your current employer will only care about your most recent passport; ask them.
  2. A stamped notice from the police confirming that you were resident in China for the given period. This means that your friend will have to go to the PSB in which you registered (the one you went to whenever you re-entered China and came back to your apartment or house) and ask them for a stamped record of your residence. If you lived in several different areas of a city, your friend can just go to the last one you registered at, as city PSBs share their data. However, if you have lived in multiple cities and your school wants statements for your whole time in China, not just for a particular city, your friend will need to go to the last PSBs you were signed in at in each city. These documents will need to be notarized at a Chinese notarization office.
  3. Photocopies of all Chinese visas and exit and entry stamps in your passport(s). 
  4. A letter from your last company with its chop/stamp, saying how long you worked for them and that during your time at the company you did nothing to break the law. If you do not have such a letter, contact your company and see if they will give a copy to your friend.
  5. Your friend will also need to their own identification, whether that is their Chinese identity card or, if they are from another country or region, their passport and residence permit. They will also need a photocopy of their ID.
  6. A letter from you (in Chinese or English) saying that they are at the police station on your behalf.

Once your friend has all of these documents, he or she should take them to the Entry and Exit Bureau of your last local police station to get the Certificate of No Criminal Record.

 

Similar Posts:

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If I get an internship in China, what visa should I have? Are unpaid internships legal? http://onestop.globaltimes.cn/if-i-get-an-internship-in-china-what-visa-should-i-have-are-unpaid-internships-legal/ http://onestop.globaltimes.cn/if-i-get-an-internship-in-china-what-visa-should-i-have-are-unpaid-internships-legal/#comments Thu, 18 Jun 2015 10:13:00 +0000 http://onestop.globaltimes.cn/?p=5388

Photo by Ray from LA

Growing numbers of foreigners are coming to China for internships in the hope of improving their careers, but at the time of writing there is not yet an official "internship visa". Instead, interns may find themselves being shunted onto a number of different visas. But which of these is allowed?

This depends on what kind of internship you will be performing. It doesn't not matter whether your internship is paid or unpaid – and yes, China allows both kinds of internship.

 

M Visa for business and work internships

Until 2013, the F Visa was the primary option for those coming to China on a business-related internship. That year, however, the internship function (among other things) was split off into the M Visa. While some companies do still issue F Visas for business internships, the official method is to use an M Visa.

This visa allows the bearer to be paid for their internship. For more information on applying for an M Visa see this page.

 

X Visa for internships while studying

If you are on studying in China on an X Visa, you are allowed to perform internships or paid work provided you first submit an internship application to your school and obtain their approval. You must then go to the Entry and Exit Office your city's main Public Security Bureau to update your residence permit with details on the place you are working or interning at and the period of time that you will be employed for. 

Then you can work part-time or on internship with pay, though it is legal for the company to offer your internship without pay.

 

Do not perform internships on a Tourist Visa!

Note that it is absolutely illegal to perform internships on a Tourist Visa, aka L Visa. This is regarded as working illegally in China and you may be fined or even deported! 

 

Useful Chinese words and phrases 

实习shíxíInternship
不带薪bú dàixīnWithout pay
带薪dàixīnWith pay
非法工作fēifǎ gōngzuòIllegally working

 

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Photo by Ray from LA

Growing numbers of foreigners are coming to China for internships in the hope of improving their careers, but at the time of writing there is not yet an official “internship visa”. Instead, interns may find themselves being shunted onto a number of different visas. But which of these is allowed?

This depends on what kind of internship you will be performing. It doesn’t not matter whether your internship is paid or unpaid – and yes, China allows both kinds of internship.

 

M Visa for business and work internships

Until 2013, the F Visa was the primary option for those coming to China on a business-related internship. That year, however, the internship function (among other things) was split off into the M Visa. While some companies do still issue F Visas for business internships, the official method is to use an M Visa.

This visa allows the bearer to be paid for their internship. For more information on applying for an M Visa see this page.

 

X Visa for internships while studying

If you are on studying in China on an X Visa, you are allowed to perform internships or paid work provided you first submit an internship application to your school and obtain their approval. You must then go to the Entry and Exit Office your city’s main Public Security Bureau to update your residence permit with details on the place you are working or interning at and the period of time that you will be employed for. 

Then you can work part-time or on internship with pay, though it is legal for the company to offer your internship without pay.

 

Do not perform internships on a Tourist Visa!

Note that it is absolutely illegal to perform internships on a Tourist Visa, aka L Visa. This is regarded as working illegally in China and you may be fined or even deported! 

 

Useful Chinese words and phrases 

实习 shíxí Internship
不带薪 bú dàixīn Without pay
带薪 dàixīn With pay
非法工作 fēifǎ gōngzuò Illegally working

 

Similar Posts:

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Can I get a Chinese mainland tourist visa in a country or region outside my own? http://onestop.globaltimes.cn/can-i-get-a-chinese-mainland-tourist-visa-in-a-country-or-region-outside-my-own/ http://onestop.globaltimes.cn/can-i-get-a-chinese-mainland-tourist-visa-in-a-country-or-region-outside-my-own/#comments Wed, 17 Jun 2015 08:55:53 +0000 http://onestop.globaltimes.cn/?p=5376

Photo by Elliott Brown

If you're travelling around Asia at the moment and want to make a visit to the Chinese mainland while you are in the region, you will probably need to apply for a Chinese Tourist Visa from outside your own country. This is technically possible, although if China is going through a period of tightening visa controls, you may find your application refused (note that if you are in the third country as a resident – eg a student or worker – and have the appropriate visa for that country, this should never be an issue; your country of residence will be treated the same as your home country). 

The safest thing to do is to apply at a Chinese embassy or consulate in your own country before you begin your trip, as you don't need to enter China from the same country you got your visa in. However, if it's too late for that you could try to visit a Chinese embassy or consulate in a third country to find out whether they will accept your application.

If your application is accepted and a visa is granted, your length of stay will be decided by the visa officers and based on the documents you have prepared and your reason for coming to China. Generally speaking, the fact that you have applied from outside your own country shouldn't affect the length of your stay at all.

 

Applying from Hong Kong, Macao and Taiwan

In the context of applying for Chinese mainland visas, Hong Kong, Macao and Taiwan all function in the same was as third countries. Previously, many people thought that applying for a mainland visa application in Hong Kong would guarantee a return. However, these days applying from Hong Kong and Macao – especially on "visa runs" in which people bounce in and out of the mainland to keep renewing tourist visas – does not necessarily mean success. Taiwan remains somewhat easier to get tourist visas from – although visa runs are still highly discouraged. 

 

Notes on expiry dates

Do be aware that Chinese tourist visas expire after the "Enter Before" date printed on the visa; if you don't enter the country by this date, you will have to apply again for an L Visa before you can enter the Chinese mainland. 

There is usually a period of three months between the date of issue and the "Enter Before" date, so don't apply for your visa more than three months before you intend to enter the country. If you are planning to visit other countries before you come to China, give yourself some "buffer time" in case of delays (or in case you decide to spend a little extra time abroad!). 

Useful Chinese words and phrases 

旅游签证lǚyóu qiānzhèngTourist visa
第三国dìsān guóThird country
有效期yǒuxiào qīEnter before
停留期tíngliú qīDuration of stay

 

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Photo by Elliott Brown

If you’re travelling around Asia at the moment and want to make a visit to the Chinese mainland while you are in the region, you will probably need to apply for a Chinese Tourist Visa from outside your own country. This is technically possible, although if China is going through a period of tightening visa controls, you may find your application refused (note that if you are in the third country as a resident – eg a student or worker – and have the appropriate visa for that country, this should never be an issue; your country of residence will be treated the same as your home country). 

The safest thing to do is to apply at a Chinese embassy or consulate in your own country before you begin your trip, as you don’t need to enter China from the same country you got your visa in. However, if it’s too late for that you could try to visit a Chinese embassy or consulate in a third country to find out whether they will accept your application.

If your application is accepted and a visa is granted, your length of stay will be decided by the visa officers and based on the documents you have prepared and your reason for coming to China. Generally speaking, the fact that you have applied from outside your own country shouldn’t affect the length of your stay at all.

 

Applying from Hong Kong, Macao and Taiwan

In the context of applying for Chinese mainland visas, Hong Kong, Macao and Taiwan all function in the same was as third countries. Previously, many people thought that applying for a mainland visa application in Hong Kong would guarantee a return. However, these days applying from Hong Kong and Macao – especially on “visa runs” in which people bounce in and out of the mainland to keep renewing tourist visas – does not necessarily mean success. Taiwan remains somewhat easier to get tourist visas from – although visa runs are still highly discouraged. 

 

Notes on expiry dates

Do be aware that Chinese tourist visas expire after the “Enter Before” date printed on the visa; if you don’t enter the country by this date, you will have to apply again for an L Visa before you can enter the Chinese mainland. 

There is usually a period of three months between the date of issue and the “Enter Before” date, so don’t apply for your visa more than three months before you intend to enter the country. If you are planning to visit other countries before you come to China, give yourself some “buffer time” in case of delays (or in case you decide to spend a little extra time abroad!). 

Useful Chinese words and phrases 

旅游签证 lǚyóu qiānzhèng Tourist visa
第三国 dìsān guó Third country
有效期 yǒuxiào qī Enter before
停留期 tíngliú qī Duration of stay

 

Similar Posts:

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Is it legal to do a second job on a Z Visa and Employment Permit? http://onestop.globaltimes.cn/is-it-legal-to-do-a-second-job-on-a-z-visa-and-employment-permit/ http://onestop.globaltimes.cn/is-it-legal-to-do-a-second-job-on-a-z-visa-and-employment-permit/#comments Tue, 16 Jun 2015 06:41:59 +0000 http://onestop.globaltimes.cn/?p=5372

Foreigners are allowed to work second jobs on the Chinese mainland even if their Employment Permit is registered to another company. The authorities will have no issue with this.

However, if this is something you are looking into, then you should make sure that your current employers will be okay with the situation – if there is nothing specified in your contract about not working part-time jobs, then it is legal. It is also advisable to sign a part-time contract with the company so that your rights can be protected.

If the part-time company is either Chinese or a foreign company based in China, it should deduct the taxable income from your salary first before paying the money to your personal account. This money should then be sent by the company to its local tax bureau. Some companies may pay the full amount to the employee and tell them to pay the money themselves at the tax bureau, but this is fairly uncommon.

If you are being paid by a foreign company based overseas, it should also deduct the taxable income (as applied in its own country) and submit that sum to the foreign tax bureau before paying you your wages.

 

Calculating tax rates for part-time jobs for foreigners

If your monthly income is 4,000 yuan or less, your taxable income is your income minus 800. The actual tax you pay is 20 percent of the taxable income. 

For example, if your income is 4,000 yuan per month, your taxable income is 3,200 yuan (4,000 minus 800). Of that, 20 percent is tax, so the total tax paid each month is 640 yuan.

If the income is 4,001 yuan or more per month, the taxable income should be 80 percent of your income, and then the tax you should pay is 20 percent of that figure.

So for an income of 5,000 yuan per month, the taxable income is 4,000 yuan, so the tax paid each month is 800 yuan.

 

Useful Chinese words and phrases 

兼职jiānzhíPart-time jobs
税率shuìlǜTax rate
结汇jiéhuìExchange settlement
劳务报酬láowù bàochóuRemuneration of Labor

 

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Foreigners are allowed to work second jobs on the Chinese mainland even if their Employment Permit is registered to another company. The authorities will have no issue with this.

However, if this is something you are looking into, then you should make sure that your current employers will be okay with the situation – if there is nothing specified in your contract about not working part-time jobs, then it is legal. It is also advisable to sign a part-time contract with the company so that your rights can be protected.

If the part-time company is either Chinese or a foreign company based in China, it should deduct the taxable income from your salary first before paying the money to your personal account. This money should then be sent by the company to its local tax bureau. Some companies may pay the full amount to the employee and tell them to pay the money themselves at the tax bureau, but this is fairly uncommon.

If you are being paid by a foreign company based overseas, it should also deduct the taxable income (as applied in its own country) and submit that sum to the foreign tax bureau before paying you your wages.

 

Calculating tax rates for part-time jobs for foreigners

If your monthly income is 4,000 yuan or less, your taxable income is your income minus 800. The actual tax you pay is 20 percent of the taxable income. 

For example, if your income is 4,000 yuan per month, your taxable income is 3,200 yuan (4,000 minus 800). Of that, 20 percent is tax, so the total tax paid each month is 640 yuan.

If the income is 4,001 yuan or more per month, the taxable income should be 80 percent of your income, and then the tax you should pay is 20 percent of that figure.

So for an income of 5,000 yuan per month, the taxable income is 4,000 yuan, so the tax paid each month is 800 yuan.

 

Useful Chinese words and phrases 

兼职 jiānzhí Part-time jobs
税率 shuìlǜ Tax rate
结汇 jiéhuì Exchange settlement
劳务报酬 láowù bàochóu Remuneration of Labor

 

Similar Posts:

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Can foreigners invest in bonds, funds or real estate on the Chinese mainland? http://onestop.globaltimes.cn/can-foreigners-invest-in-bonds-funds-or-real-estate-on-the-chinese-mainland/ http://onestop.globaltimes.cn/can-foreigners-invest-in-bonds-funds-or-real-estate-on-the-chinese-mainland/#comments Mon, 15 Jun 2015 09:22:21 +0000 http://onestop.globaltimes.cn/?p=5360

Yes indeed – Chinese bonds and funds are both open to foreign investors on the mainland, and the property industry was removed from the catalog of restricted investments (opening it to non-Chinese investors) on April 10, 2015. However, at the time of writing, foreign individuals can still only buy one house or apartment.

Bonds and funds can be purchased through either a bank or a securities firm; shop around to see which ones have the products and rates that suit your needs.

 

Security tips for investing in bonds and funds 

  1. Always use the large, legal securities firms; this is one area where big brand names count. If you're not sure whether a firm is legit, look it up at the website of the China Securities Regulatory Commission (CSRC).
  2. If you want to be absolutely certain about your investment you could elect to sign up in person, rather than through a website. This way you can be sure that their supposed physical address is their real one, and also check their business license, which should be hanging up on the wall of their office; it will show the company's name, registered date, registered capital and what activities it is allowed to engage in. You can also check these details on this website. You can also check the company's tax certificate on your local tax bureau's website.
  3. If you elect to open your account on the websites of a security firm, make sure that it is the real deal, and not a fake website set up by scammers to steal (or 'phish') data and private information.
  4. Beware of private companies or brokers who promise high return rates. All such investments have uncertainties and risks – and, of course, the higher the return, the higher the risk. Those who promise guaranteed returns are, at best, behaving unethically; at worst, they may be members of supposed investment companies that disappear as soon as people pay money into their nonexistent "funds".
  5. If you can, consult a trustworthy friend who understands and is experienced with securities before you make any decisions – but make sure you make your decision independently.

 

Security tips on investing in real estate on the mainland

  1. Make sure the property developer in question has the Sale to Foreigners Permit; without this, they cannot legally oversee any sale of property to non-Chinese people. If they are attempting to do so anyway, they may be engaging in a scam.
  2. Check the developer whether has the following five permits: Certificate for the Use of State-Owned Land; Planning Permit for Construction Engineering; Planning Permit for Construction Land Use; Construction Works Permits and Commercial Housing Pre-sale Permits. Without these five permits, any sale of a house or apartment from them is illegal. They should have all of these permits ready to show potential customers.
  3. If you buy a second-hand home, you should check the Property Ownership Certificate and the identity card of the owner to make sure they are the same person. Also, visit the website of your local housing management bureau to check whether that house or apartment is registered in their name to make sure it is a legal property that can be traded. Also, check with the bureau to see whether this property is eligible to have its ownership transferred.
  4. If you buy from an agency, check at the Commercial and Industrial Bureau’s website to see if the agency has been registered with them. Do not give money to the agency until you have confirmed all of the above information..

Help! I've been ripped off when buying Chinese bonds, funds or property. What can I do?
If you have been ripped off, you should go to report the crime to the police as early as possible. Take all your contracts, receipts and proofs together with you as proof of the company's scam. Once it is in the hands of the police, there is little else you can do.

 

Useful Chinese words and phrases 

基金jījīnFund
债券zhàiquànBond
证券zhèngquànSecurities
证监会zhèng jiān huìChina Securities Regulatory Commission
中介zhōngjièAgency
房屋所有者fángwū suǒyǒuzhěProperty owner
房产证fángchǎn zhèngProperty Ownership Certificate
外售证wàishòu zhèngSale to Foreigners Permit
预售证yùshòu zhèngCommercial Housing  Pre-sale Permits
国有土地使用证guóyǒu tǔdì shǐyòngzhèngCertificate for the Use of State-Owned Land
建设工程规划许可证jiànshè gōngchéng guīhuá xǔkězhèngPlanning Permit for Construction Engineering
建设用地规划许可证jiànshè yòngdì guīhuá xǔkězhèngPlanning Permit for Construction Land Use
建筑工程施工许可证jiànzhù gōngchéng shīgōng xǔkězhèngConstruction Works Permits
商品房预售许可证shāngpǐnfáng yùshòu xǔkězhèngCommercial Housing Pre-sale Permits

 

 

 

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Yes indeed – Chinese bonds and funds are both open to foreign investors on the mainland, and the property industry was removed from the catalog of restricted investments (opening it to non-Chinese investors) on April 10, 2015. However, at the time of writing, foreign individuals can still only buy one house or apartment.

Bonds and funds can be purchased through either a bank or a securities firm; shop around to see which ones have the products and rates that suit your needs.

 

Security tips for investing in bonds and funds 

  1. Always use the large, legal securities firms; this is one area where big brand names count. If you’re not sure whether a firm is legit, look it up at the website of the China Securities Regulatory Commission (CSRC).
  2. If you want to be absolutely certain about your investment you could elect to sign up in person, rather than through a website. This way you can be sure that their supposed physical address is their real one, and also check their business license, which should be hanging up on the wall of their office; it will show the company’s name, registered date, registered capital and what activities it is allowed to engage in. You can also check these details on this website. You can also check the company’s tax certificate on your local tax bureau’s website.
  3. If you elect to open your account on the websites of a security firm, make sure that it is the real deal, and not a fake website set up by scammers to steal (or ‘phish’) data and private information.
  4. Beware of private companies or brokers who promise high return rates. All such investments have uncertainties and risks – and, of course, the higher the return, the higher the risk. Those who promise guaranteed returns are, at best, behaving unethically; at worst, they may be members of supposed investment companies that disappear as soon as people pay money into their nonexistent “funds”.
  5. If you can, consult a trustworthy friend who understands and is experienced with securities before you make any decisions – but make sure you make your decision independently.

 

Security tips on investing in real estate on the mainland

  1. Make sure the property developer in question has the Sale to Foreigners Permit; without this, they cannot legally oversee any sale of property to non-Chinese people. If they are attempting to do so anyway, they may be engaging in a scam.
  2. Check the developer whether has the following five permits: Certificate for the Use of State-Owned Land; Planning Permit for Construction Engineering; Planning Permit for Construction Land Use; Construction Works Permits and Commercial Housing Pre-sale Permits. Without these five permits, any sale of a house or apartment from them is illegal. They should have all of these permits ready to show potential customers.
  3. If you buy a second-hand home, you should check the Property Ownership Certificate and the identity card of the owner to make sure they are the same person. Also, visit the website of your local housing management bureau to check whether that house or apartment is registered in their name to make sure it is a legal property that can be traded. Also, check with the bureau to see whether this property is eligible to have its ownership transferred.
  4. If you buy from an agency, check at the Commercial and Industrial Bureau’s website to see if the agency has been registered with them. Do not give money to the agency until you have confirmed all of the above information..

Help! I’ve been ripped off when buying Chinese bonds, funds or property. What can I do?
If you have been ripped off, you should go to report the crime to the police as early as possible. Take all your contracts, receipts and proofs together with you as proof of the company’s scam. Once it is in the hands of the police, there is little else you can do.

 

Useful Chinese words and phrases 

基金 jījīn Fund
债券 zhàiquàn Bond
证券 zhèngquàn Securities
证监会 zhèng jiān huì China Securities Regulatory Commission
中介 zhōngjiè Agency
房屋所有者 fángwū suǒyǒuzhě Property owner
房产证 fángchǎn zhèng Property Ownership Certificate
外售证 wàishòu zhèng Sale to Foreigners Permit
预售证 yùshòu zhèng Commercial Housing  Pre-sale Permits
国有土地使用证 guóyǒu tǔdì shǐyòngzhèng Certificate for the Use of State-Owned Land
建设工程规划许可证 jiànshè gōngchéng guīhuá xǔkězhèng Planning Permit for Construction Engineering
建设用地规划许可证 jiànshè yòngdì guīhuá xǔkězhèng Planning Permit for Construction Land Use
建筑工程施工许可证 jiànzhù gōngchéng shīgōng xǔkězhèng Construction Works Permits
商品房预售许可证 shāngpǐnfáng yùshòu xǔkězhèng Commercial Housing Pre-sale Permits

 

 

 

Similar Posts:

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Can foreigners invest in the Chinese stock market? http://onestop.globaltimes.cn/can-foreigners-invest-in-the-chinese-stock-market/ http://onestop.globaltimes.cn/can-foreigners-invest-in-the-chinese-stock-market/#comments Fri, 12 Jun 2015 12:04:49 +0000 http://onestop.globaltimes.cn/?p=5353

Image by Geralt

Foreigners can indeed buy stocks and shares in both the Chinese mainland and Hong Kong, although it's not always as straightforward as it might be for them back home. 

 

Playing the Chinese stock market

The Chinese stock market is divided into three kinds of shares: A Shares, which are restricted to Chinese citizens and Qualified Foreign Institutional Investors; B Shares, which are open to all foreigners, and H Shares, which are Hong-Kong-based shares and also open to foreign investment.

In order to trade in A Shares, which are bought and sold in RMB, foreign companies must first get a bank to submit a Qualified Foreign Institutional Investor application form to the China Securities Regulatory Commission (in order to get a permit allowing them to invest in RMB) and also submit an Investment Quota Application to the State Administration of Foreign Exchange.

Once these have both been done, the company can then approach a Chinese securities company to make the investment. However, there is a high threshold for entry: the company must own at least $500 million (for insurance companies, asset management companies etc) or $5 billion (for foreign securities firms and banks). 

The B Shares use US dollars or HK dollars as denominations and are issued by Chinese companies listed in the Chinese mainland – although ironically they cannot be bought by Chinese citizens. If you want to trade in these shares, take your passport and residence permit to a securities firm to open a B Share account. You will need to deposit at least $1,000.

H Shares are bought in HK dollars, and are issued by Chinese companies listed in Hong Kong. In order to invest in these shares, you must go to Hong Kong and open an investment account in a HK bank, putting in at least 10,000 HK dollars. The account can be opened with your HK visa, your passport and your Chinese mainland residence permit. You must go to Hong Kong in person to open the account, but then you can return to the mainland to make deals online. It is open to anyone, foreign or Chinese.

Foreigners can also buy funds and bonds in China from commercial banks, securities firms and other sales agencies, by opening a fund or bond account at said agencies. 

 

Security tips for investing in stock market

  1. To ensure that the bank or securities firm you are opening an account with is trustworthy, make sure that they have the qualifications necessary for trading. You can do so on the website of the China Securities Regulatory Commission (CSRC; no English version).
  2. If you are signing up to a securities firm online, make sure that the website is legitimate and not a clone or fake. Genuine securities firms do not promise profits or returns, and they will sign printed consulting contracts with you if you use their services. In addition, they are only allowed to receive money via company or business accounts, not personal accounts.
  3. It is advised to check whether an agency or broker has the qualifications necessary to sell securities, also at the China Securities Regulatory Commission website.
  4. Do not trust anyone who claims to have insider information on stock market trading.
  5. Do not trust anyone – even a so-called expert – who claims to be able to give precise predictions of the stock market. Likewise, don't trust trading software that claims to be able to predict the stock market's movements.

Useful Chinese words and phrases 

股市gǔshìStock market
基金jījīnFund
债券zhàiquànBond
证券zhèngquànSecurities
证监会zhèng jiān huìChina Securities Regulatory Commission
中介zhōngjièAgency

 

]]>

Image by Geralt

Foreigners can indeed buy stocks and shares in both the Chinese mainland and Hong Kong, although it’s not always as straightforward as it might be for them back home. 

 

Playing the Chinese stock market

The Chinese stock market is divided into three kinds of shares: A Shares, which are restricted to Chinese citizens and Qualified Foreign Institutional Investors; B Shares, which are open to all foreigners, and H Shares, which are Hong-Kong-based shares and also open to foreign investment.

In order to trade in A Shares, which are bought and sold in RMB, foreign companies must first get a bank to submit a Qualified Foreign Institutional Investor application form to the China Securities Regulatory Commission (in order to get a permit allowing them to invest in RMB) and also submit an Investment Quota Application to the State Administration of Foreign Exchange.

Once these have both been done, the company can then approach a Chinese securities company to make the investment. However, there is a high threshold for entry: the company must own at least $500 million (for insurance companies, asset management companies etc) or $5 billion (for foreign securities firms and banks). 

The B Shares use US dollars or HK dollars as denominations and are issued by Chinese companies listed in the Chinese mainland – although ironically they cannot be bought by Chinese citizens. If you want to trade in these shares, take your passport and residence permit to a securities firm to open a B Share account. You will need to deposit at least $1,000.

H Shares are bought in HK dollars, and are issued by Chinese companies listed in Hong Kong. In order to invest in these shares, you must go to Hong Kong and open an investment account in a HK bank, putting in at least 10,000 HK dollars. The account can be opened with your HK visa, your passport and your Chinese mainland residence permit. You must go to Hong Kong in person to open the account, but then you can return to the mainland to make deals online. It is open to anyone, foreign or Chinese.

Foreigners can also buy funds and bonds in China from commercial banks, securities firms and other sales agencies, by opening a fund or bond account at said agencies. 

 

Security tips for investing in stock market

  1. To ensure that the bank or securities firm you are opening an account with is trustworthy, make sure that they have the qualifications necessary for trading. You can do so on the website of the China Securities Regulatory Commission (CSRC; no English version).
  2. If you are signing up to a securities firm online, make sure that the website is legitimate and not a clone or fake. Genuine securities firms do not promise profits or returns, and they will sign printed consulting contracts with you if you use their services. In addition, they are only allowed to receive money via company or business accounts, not personal accounts.
  3. It is advised to check whether an agency or broker has the qualifications necessary to sell securities, also at the China Securities Regulatory Commission website.
  4. Do not trust anyone who claims to have insider information on stock market trading.
  5. Do not trust anyone – even a so-called expert – who claims to be able to give precise predictions of the stock market. Likewise, don’t trust trading software that claims to be able to predict the stock market’s movements.

Useful Chinese words and phrases 

股市 gǔshì Stock market
基金 jījīn Fund
债券 zhàiquàn Bond
证券 zhèngquàn Securities
证监会 zhèng jiān huì China Securities Regulatory Commission
中介 zhōngjiè Agency

 

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Can I get a Chinese tourist visa without booking a plane or hotel, or having an itinerary? http://onestop.globaltimes.cn/can-i-get-a-chinese-tourist-visa-without-booking-a-plane-or-hotel-or-having-an-itinerary/ http://onestop.globaltimes.cn/can-i-get-a-chinese-tourist-visa-without-booking-a-plane-or-hotel-or-having-an-itinerary/#comments Thu, 04 Jun 2015 10:43:38 +0000 http://onestop.globaltimes.cn/?p=5220

Photo by Unsplash

Who doesn't want to stride across the wide expanse of China, the wind at their back, with no plans and no worries, just an unknown adventure ahead? Unfortunately, generally speaking it is impossible to get a Chinese mainland tourist visa if you don't submit proof of bookings for inbound and outbound flights and at least some accommodation, as well as an itinerary explaining some of what you plan to do. If you're staying with a friend you'll also need to provide a letter from them saying that they are inviting you to stay in their home.

This is because the Chinese government wants to ensure that it can keep tabs on tourists, so that they don't end up with lots of random foreigners roaming the countryside. To this end, when you check into a hotel your information will be automatically registered into the police database (alternatively, if you're staying with a friend you'll need to go to their nearest police station to register yourself). 

Theoretically, if the hotel you are staying in is not the same as in your booking record, the police might be alerted, which may affect your visa applications in future.

In reality, though, it's rarely that strict, and tourists have been known to get tourism visas with just the plane tickets, a hotel booking for the first night of stay in China and a vague itinerary. And as the bookings don't need to be paid for, they could theoretically be cancelled once the visa has been acquired. 

Still, the possibility remains that this could catch up with you, so it's recommended to stick to the rules as closely as you can.

You can check this article to learn how to apply for an L visa and click here to learn how to get an invitation letter from a friend in China.

Useful Chinese words and phrases 

住宿预订zhùsù yùdìngBooking accommodation
行程表xíngchéng biǎoItinerary
邀请函yāoqǐng hánInvitation letter

 

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Photo by Unsplash

Who doesn’t want to stride across the wide expanse of China, the wind at their back, with no plans and no worries, just an unknown adventure ahead? Unfortunately, generally speaking it is impossible to get a Chinese mainland tourist visa if you don’t submit proof of bookings for inbound and outbound flights and at least some accommodation, as well as an itinerary explaining some of what you plan to do. If you’re staying with a friend you’ll also need to provide a letter from them saying that they are inviting you to stay in their home.

This is because the Chinese government wants to ensure that it can keep tabs on tourists, so that they don’t end up with lots of random foreigners roaming the countryside. To this end, when you check into a hotel your information will be automatically registered into the police database (alternatively, if you’re staying with a friend you’ll need to go to their nearest police station to register yourself). 

Theoretically, if the hotel you are staying in is not the same as in your booking record, the police might be alerted, which may affect your visa applications in future.

In reality, though, it’s rarely that strict, and tourists have been known to get tourism visas with just the plane tickets, a hotel booking for the first night of stay in China and a vague itinerary. And as the bookings don’t need to be paid for, they could theoretically be cancelled once the visa has been acquired. 

Still, the possibility remains that this could catch up with you, so it’s recommended to stick to the rules as closely as you can.

You can check this article to learn how to apply for an L visa and click here to learn how to get an invitation letter from a friend in China.

Useful Chinese words and phrases 

住宿预订 zhùsù yùdìng Booking accommodation
行程表 xíngchéng biǎo Itinerary
邀请函 yāoqǐng hán Invitation letter

 

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