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New Z Visa regulations from Oct 31, 2014: How the changes affect you





China’s visa rules are prone to regular changes, and it’s vital to stay abreast of the tweaks in the system. Here’s how the changes announced in September 2014 affect those applying for a work visa in China from October 2014. Teachers should pay close attention.

 

The new guidelines

The new guidelines issued in September 2014 by Beijing municipal government are aimed mainly at foreign teachers in China. The new, stricter rules have been reported to be a response to numerous sex scandals involving foreign English-language teachers working in China. 

The nub of this is that foreign teachers (whether teaching English or anything else) must meet more stringent demands – particularly with regards to formal qualifications – before they can obtain a work visa. 

The new regulations break down as follows:

  • Language teachers must have a bachelor’s degree and at least two years’ relevant work experience.
  • Non-language teachers must have five years’ work experience teaching the subject they plan to teach in China.

From October 31, new foreign teachers will be asked to provide teaching qualifications from their home countries and proof of five years’ teaching experience to apply for jobs at kindergartens, primary and high schools, international schools and language training schools.

If you don’t have teaching qualifications from your home country, you should present other internationally recognized professional credentials, such as a Teaching English as a Foreign Language (TEFL), Teaching English as a Second Language (TESL), Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL), Certificate in English Language Teaching to Adults (CELTA) or Teaching Knowledge Test (TKT) qualification.

Work visa applicants should be between 18 and 60 years old, although the upper limit may be extended to 65 in the case of senior foreign experts.

Work visa applicants must have no criminal record in their home country, and must be able to demonstrate this via a criminal background check.

 

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3 Responses to New Z Visa regulations from Oct 31, 2014: How the changes affect you

  • Degree FOLLOWED BY two years of teaching experience?

    As it reads above, and from other sources that I have referred to, the requirements for language teachers are ‘a AND b’, but they are not sequential ‘a THEN b’.

    From the post above:

    “The new regulations break down as follows: Language teachers must have a bachelor’s degree and at least two years’ relevant work experience.”

    Are some authorities interpreting this rule as: ‘Degree FOLLOWED BY two years of teaching experience? [a THEN b]??
    All of my four years’ ESL teaching was actually done BEFORE I obtained my degree.

    That is, I was able to teach ESL for about four years in both North America and in South Korea without the completed degree, but with a Canadian two-year university certificate.

    I didn’t believe that the sequence mattered, but a recruiter – posing as a government vocational school’s in-house human resources recruiter – claimed recently that I can’t work in China on a Z visa because my experience in ESL experience is not post-degree.

    Is this true? It doesn’t sound plausible, but he may be right. Must at least two years’ experience be post-degree?

  • Will this affect teachers who are already working and granted a visa in China but do not have the 5 years experience?

    • Ash, the change will only affect foreigners who are actually seeking employment in Beijing now; the PSB should not apply these rules to visas that have already been issued, even on renewal. However, it will probably affect you if you quit your job and seek another, similar position. Good luck!

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